Thank You to Polaroid for Camera Sponsership

Polaroid Gift Shots in North Korea

Polaroid gift photo, Songdowon Children’s Camp, Wonsan, North Korea – photo by Joseph A Ferris III

The American in North Korea Blog, along with my partners over at The North Korea Blog, want to thank Polaroid for their generous sponsorship of a Z340 Instant Digital Camera for our most recent trip to the DPRK, North Korea. Connecting with North Korean locals was our biggest goal for the trip, and the Z340 was a tremendous help in the accomplishment of this mission. More than just showing our pictures to locals on a digital camera video screen, the Z340 Instant Digital Camera let us give something back, and judging by the enthusiasm and reactions encountered we trust that the images from the Z340 will be cherished by the people we shared them with.  Thanks again Polaroid – we look forward to more photos shared on our projected 2013 return trip to the DPRK!

Polaroid Gift Shots in North Korea

Sailors on the USS Pueblo receive their Polaroid photo.

Polaroid Gift Shots in North Korea

BBQ restaurant waitress showing off their Polaroid gift photo.

Polaroid Gift Shots in North Korea

Girls receive a gift Polaroid picture at the Kaeson Fun Fair, Pyongyang.

Polaroid Gift Shots in North Korea

A group of girls and their gift photo at Kim Il-sung Square, Pyongyang.

Polaroid Gift Shots in North Korea

A group of girls and their gift photo at Kim Il-sung Square, Pyongyang.

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Gift picture with girls at the 100th Year Kim Il Sung Birthday Celebrations.

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4 responses

  1. realmarkfahey

    Great idea, very cool! Did handing out the photos always have the same reaction and was the whole concept of instantly being able to hand them a photo something really unbelievably fantastic to the Koreans? I’m assuming the Polaroid process must have seemed like science fiction!

    April 28, 2012 at 9:56 am

  2. People were definitely surprised when a pic printed out and was given as a gift. We were mobbed at times by interested locals, and while people were always respectful, they definitely got excited by the whole experience.

    April 28, 2012 at 1:55 pm

  3. In these pictures you showed the emotions of individuals. There were also the huge crowds that formed, full of excitement and joy, to see the pictures. I can’t think of anything we could have left as simple yet meaningful as images of people enjoying themselves together. Those printed pictures created instant community and connection.

    We can’t email them, but even if we could, there’s nothing like a photograph you can touch.

    May 2, 2012 at 4:20 am

  4. Pingback: USS Pueblo Guide « American in North Korea

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