Posts tagged “art

The Non Propaganda Kindergarten Environment

From past posts readers might be under the impression that North Korean kindergartens are overwhelmingly filled with political and military statues and art.  But there is a sweeter, more innocent side to DPRK kindergartens, aspects of which I would like to highlight in this photo post:

Chongjin Kindergarten North Korea

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Photos from Chongjin and Rason Kindergartens .


Kindergarten Tank Art

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Crayon drawing of a tank displayed at a Kindergarten in Rason, North Korea – photo by Joseph A Ferris III


North Korean Graffiti

Graffiti that I found under a bridge at Inner Mt. Chilbo, North Korea.

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More North Korean Children’s School Propaganda Art

Rason Foreign Language School North Korea

Framed print at the Rason Foreign Language School showing school children stabbing an American GI, Japanese imperialist, and a South Korean running dog.

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Jet, apple, ship, star, tank, and pear on a poster at the Sonbong Kindergarten.

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Military personnel, unified Korea, and a missile launch on a painted exterior wall at the Sonbong Kindergarten.

Photos by Joseph A Ferris III


North Korean Kindergarden Propaganda

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Framed print of children attacking US soldier snowmen at the Chongjin Kindergarten.  I have been told the Korean script on the snowmen says “American bastards” -  extreme propaganda for a kindergarten!

This painting of the North Korean missile was also found at this Chongjin Kindergarten.

Photo by Joseph A Ferris III

Update – further details on the translation from my comments:  The snowman on the left appears to have “쥐명박” (jui-myeong-bak) written on it. The name of South Korea’s former president is “이명박” (lee-myeong-bak). They have changed the family name of the former president from the original “이” (lee) to “쥐” (jui), which means “rat”. The DPRK often referred to him as a rat and Seoul as a rat’s nest. Nice find, Captain!


Snow White in North Korea

Snow White in North Korea

Snow White in North Korea – did Disney authorize this embroidery piece from the Pyongyang Embroidery Institute?  I think not.

Snow White in North Korea

I couldn’t resist and bought the piece for $40.

Somewhat shunned by other tour groups, my group loved the Pyongyang Embroidery Institute. You get to see girls hard at work on elaborate embroidery  pieces and shop their showroom for great deals on amazing artwork ranging from revolutionary war subjects to scenes of traditional Korean maidens, and yes, even Walt Disney.


Pyongyang Film Studios

Film Studio Pyongyang, North Korea

Hanging out next to a South Korean brothel on ’60s street at the Pyongyang Film Studios.

From the Lonely Planet online guide – Some 20 films a year are still churned out by the county’s main film studios located in the suburbs of Pyongyang. Kim Il Sung visited the complex around 20 times during his lifetime to provide invaluable on-the-spot guidance, while Kim Jr has been more than 600 times, such is his passionate interest in films. Like all things North Korean, the two main focuses are the anti-Japanese struggle and the anti-American war.

The main complex is a huge, propaganda-filled suite of office buildings where apparently post-production goes on, even though it feels eerily empty. A short uphill drive takes you to the large sets, however, which are far more fun. Here you’ll find a generic ancient Korean town for historic films (you can even dress up as a king or queen and be photographed sitting on a ‘throne’ carpeted in leopard skin), a 1930s Chinese street, a Japanese street, a south Korean street (look for the massage signs that illustrate their compatriots’ moral laxity) and a fairly bizarre range of structures from a collection of ‘European’ buildings. Some groups have been lucky and seen films being made during their visit, although usually it’s hauntingly empty.

More pics from the Pyongyang Film Studio linked below.

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More photos from the Mangyongdae Children’s Palace

Gymnasts, dancers, and little stars perform at the Mangyongdae Children’s Palace:

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

The Mangyongdae Children’s Palace; a place for children of the privileged elite to spend time after school practicing sports, art, folk dance and music – and of course, show it all off with military like precision and forced smiles to groups of visiting foreign friends and tourists. More from this series linked below – all photos by Joseph A Ferris III

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Mangyongdae Children’s Palace

The Mangyongdae Children’s Palace; a place for children of the privileged elite to spend time after school practicing sports, art, folk dance and music – and of course, show it all off with military like precision and forced smiles to groups of visiting foreign friends and tourists.

Mangyongdae Children's Palace

Young Pioneers sing a martial song during a special Kim Il-sung’s 100th birthday celebratory performance at the Mangyongdae Children’s Palace. More pictures from this set linked below.

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North Korean Roadside Attactions

Hamhung, North Korea

Soldier squirrels, missiles, and AK-47s raised defiantly into the air, just a few examples of the roadside attractions (propaganda) commonly seen in towns outside Pyongyang, North Korea.

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Pyongyang Apartments

Pyongyang Apartment North Korea

A view of typical housing arrangements in Pyongyang, North Korea – photo by Joseph A Ferris III


Countryside Propaganda Billboards and Murals

A collection of images showing propaganda billboards and murals from the Wonsan and Hamhung countryside areas.

Wonson - Hamhung Countryside

Propaganda from the Wonson/Hamhung region, North Korea

Propaganda from the Wonson/Hamhung region, North Korea

Hamhung-Wonson Road

Wonson - Hamhung Countryside North Korea

Wonson - Hamhung Countryside North Korea

All photos taken April 2012 by Joseph A Ferris III


The New Kim Il-sung/Kim Jong-il Badge

New Kim Il-sung/Kim Jong-il Badge

The double Kim badge is the latest in North Korean fashion – photo by Joseph A Ferris III


Pyongyang Children’s Palace, North Korea

The Pyongyang Children’s Palace, a place for the children of the privileged elite to spend time after school practicing sports, art, folk dance and music – and of course, show it all off with military like precision and forced smiles to groups of visiting foreign friends and tourists.

Children's Palace Pyongyang, North Korea

A young girl performs a North Korean folk dance at the Pyongyang Children’s Palace.


Pyongyang Metro Propaganda

Beautiful propaganda murals, mosaics, and statues from the Pyongyang Metro. Related post and pictures about the Pyongyang Metro here.

Pyongyang Metro Propaganda Art

Pyongyang Metro

Pyongyang Metro Propaganda Art

Pyongyang Metro Propaganda Art

Pyongyang Metro Propaganda Art

Jordan Harbinger on the Pyongyang Metro


Kim Jong II 12-17-11

A photo collection of Kim Jong-il in art from my Aug. 2011 North Korea trip.

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Pyongyang scene with Kim Jong-il.

North Korean Diorama

Kim Jong-il and Kim Il-sung give on the spot bridge building guidance. Diorama from the Pyongyang Railway Museum.

North Korean Diorama

Kim Jong-il and Kim Il-sung give on the spot bridge building guidance. Diorama from the Pyongyang Railway Museum.

Kim Jong Il Looking at Things

Kim Jong-il and Kim Il-sung looking at Things.

Kim Jong Il and Kim II Sung

Baby Kim Jong-il and the cabin where he was born at the sacred Mt. Baekdu San – although he was really born in Russia.

Little Kim Jong-il in Battle

Baby Kim Jong-il gives “on the spot” battle guidance.

Kim Jong-il Painting

Kim Jong-il – I’m not sure what this painting is about.

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Kim Jong-il in a Pyongyang street painting.

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Kim Jong-il and Kim Il-sung in a Pyongyang Railway Museum mural.

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The ‘Dear Leader’

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Neil Strauss, Jordan Harbinger, and Ingrid De La O with Kim Jong-il.

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Kim Jong-il and Kim Il-sung at the Mt. Myohyang hotel.


Bus Conductor Woodcut North Korea

A great socialist realist piece. By Yong Sun, woodcut print. The side of the bus states, “My country is best.” – Ray Cunningham

Bus Conductor Woodcut North Korea

Photo by Ray Cunningham


North Korean Mass Human Mosaics

I introduced the mass human mosaics of the North Korean Arirang Mass Games in my last post.   Just adding a few more photos of these incredible mass flip book images.

Arirang Mass Games - North Korea

“Great Leader” Kim Il-sung

Arirang Mass Games - North Korea

Mass Flip Card Mosaic Guns
Get your guns!

Arirang Mass Games - Mass Flip Card

Arirang Mass Games - Mass Flip Card

Arirang Mass Games - North Korea

Arirang Mass Games - North Korea

Arirang Mass Games - North Korea

Proof that North Korea is a fun place!

Arirang Mass Games - Mass Flip Card

All pictures above are from the Aug. 27th 2011 Arirang Mass Games at the Rungrado May Day Stadium in Pyongyang, North Korea.


Arirang Mass Games Taekwondo

30,000 school children in perfect unison use personalized flip books to create the mass human mosaics of the Taekwondo arts pictured below.  These gigantic pictures displaying Korean cultural heritage and martial prowess are created by thousands of human pixels in what is the greatest performance spectacle in the world today – eat your heart out Beijing Olympics opening ceremony.    The pictures below represent just a small selection of human mosaic art from the mass flip book performances of the North Korean Arirang Mass Games.

Arirang Mass Games - North Korea

Arirang Mass Games - North Korea

Arirang Mass Games - North Korea

Arirang Mass Games - North Korea

Arirang Mass Games - North Korea

With flip book mosaics being shown in the stands, men on the stadium field perform Taekwondo moves.

Arirang Mass Games - North Korea

Arirang Mass Games - North Korea

All pictures above are from the Aug. 27th 2011 Arirang Mass Games at the Rungrado May Day Stadium in Pyongyang, North Korea.  For more information please read the description of the Mass Games by Eric Lafforgue.